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Dorit Naaman

Alliance Atlantis Professor
Queen's University
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Dorit Naaman is a documentarist and film theorist from Jerusalem, and a professor of Film and Media and Cultural Studies at Queen’s University.  In 2016 she released an innovative interactive documentary, Jerusalem, We Are Here, offering a model for digital witnessing.  The project creates a novel platform that documentarist Liz Miller claimed “will become a ‘go to’ reference for educators working on the intersections of new media, oral history, geography and more.” Jerusalem, We Are Here was presented to live audiences thirty times, won two awards, and was written about in half a dozen languages. 

Dorit’s publications focus on Israeli and to a lesser extent Palestinian cinemas and media (primarily from post-colonialist and feminist perspectives).

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Anna Hudson

Professor
York University
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Anna Hudson is an art historian, curator, and writer specializing in Canadian Art, Curatorial and Indigenous Studies. Hudson is currently leading Mobilizing Inuit Cultural Heritage, a SSSHRC-supported research/creation collaboration aimed at recovering, preserving, documenting, facilitating, and disseminating Inuit knowledge, culture, and creativity. Dr. Hudson’s curatorial credits include Tunirrusiangit: Kenojuak Ashevak and Tim Pitsiulak (curated with Koomuatuk Curley, Taqralik Partridge, Jocelyn Piirainen, Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory, and Georgiana Uhlyarik, Art Gallery of Ontario, 2018); inVisibility: Indigenous in the City, part of INVISIBILITY: An Urban Aboriginal Education Connections Project (with Dr. Susan Dion and Dr. Carla Rice, Aird Gallery, Toronto, 2013); and Painting Canada: Tom Thomson and the Group of Seven (with Ian Dejardin and Katerina Atanassova, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, UK, 2011). Professor Hudson continues to pursue research in the area of her doctoral dissertation, Art and Social Progress: the Toronto Community of Painters (1933-1950).

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Kate Hennessy

Associate Professor
Simon Fraser University School of Interactive Arts and Technology
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Kate Hennessy is an Associate Professor specializing in Media at Simon Fraser University’s School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT). As an anthropologist of media and the director of the Making Culture Lab at SIAT, her research explores the role of digital technology in the documentation and safeguarding of cultural heritage. Her multimedia research-creation works and exhibitions investigate documentary methodologies to address Indigenous and settler histories of place and space. She is a founding member of the Ethnographic Terminalia Collective, which has curated exhibitions and projects at the intersection of anthropology and contemporary art since 2009.

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Julie Nagam

Chair in the History of Indigenous Art in North America
University of Winnipeg
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Dr. Julie Nagam (Meětis-German/Syrian) is the Chair of the History of Indigenous Art in North America, a joint appointment between the University of Winnipeg and the Winnipeg Art Gallery. She is an Associate Professor in the department of Art History. Her current SSHRC funded projects include The Transactive Memory Keepers: Indigenous Public Engagement in Digital and New Media Labs and Exhibitions (www.glamcollective.ca), Inuit Futures in Arts Leadership: The Pilimmaksarniq Project; The Initiative for Indigenous Futures. Dr. Nagam hosted and organized, The Future is Indigenous (http://abtec.org/iif/symposia/3rd-annual-symposium/) and the International Indigenous curators exchange with Australia, Canada, Aotearoa (New Zealand), and Finland. She has published extensively in the area of Indigenous visual culture, methodologies, performance, digital and new media. Her artwork and scholarship has been shown nationally and internationally. Nagam is the Concordia University and Massey University Scholar in Residence for 2018/19, and is building an Indigenous Research Centre of Excellence and a Digital Media Lab in Winnipeg. 

Photo Credit: Kali Spitzer

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Suzanne Morrissette

Assistant Professor
OCAD University
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Suzanne Morrissette is a Métis artist, curator, and scholar from Winnipeg who is currently based out of Toronto. Her research in the areas of Indigenous histories of resistance, and the development of liberal political philosophy in Canada have come together in the form of artworks, exhibitions, articles, and her forthcoming book which examines the progression of Indigenous relations in Canada since the early 1900s against the context of growing inclusion in the arts. She has taught liberal arts and studio courses at various universities since 2011, and currently works as Assistant Professor at Brock University in the Department of Visual Arts.

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Dolleen Tisawii'ashii Manning

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Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning is a Queen's National Scholar in Anishinaabe Language, Knowledge and Culture (ALKC), Department of Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Cultural Studies at Queen's University. A member of Kettle and Stoney Point First Nation and an interdisciplinary artist and scholar, she received a PhD from the Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism at Western University (2018), and holds graduate degrees in critical theory (MA, Western, 2005), and in contemporary art (MFA, Simon Fraser, 1997). She points to her early childhood grounding in her mother’s Anishinaabe cultural lessons as her primary philosophical influence and source of creativity. Manning has wide-ranging interests in Anishinaabe ontology, critical theory, phenomenology, and art, investigating questions of Indigenous imaging practices, mnidoo interrelationality, epistemological sovereignty, and the debilitating impact of settler colonial logics. Her investment in archives stem from her family's land claim activism and the function of the archive in the colonial state, along with their counter archival counter narrative potentialities. 

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Heather Igloliorte
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Heather Igloliorte

Concordia University Research Chair
Concordia University
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Heather Igloliorte is an Inuk Assistant Professor and University Research Chair in Indigenous Art History and Community Engagement at Concordia University, where she serves special advisor to the Provost on Advancing Indigenous Knowledges, and co-directs the Indigenous Futures Cluster of the Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture and Technology with Professor Jason Lewis. Her recent curatorial projects include SakKijâjuk: Art and Craft from Nunatsiavut (The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery, touring 2016-2020); Ilippunga: The Brousseau Inuit Art Collection at the Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec (permanent exhibition, opened 2016); and Decolonize Me (Ottawa Art Gallery, touring 2011 - 2015), and the forthcoming inaugural exhibition of the Inuit Art Centre at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. Igloliorte currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Inuit Art Foundation, Nunavut Film Board, Native North American Art Studies Association, and Faculty Council of the Otsego Institute for Native American Art History.

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Haidee Wasson
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Haidee Wasson

Professor
Concordia University
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Haidee Wasson is Professor of Film and Media in the School of Cinema, Concordia University, Montreal. She has taught also at the University of Minnesota and at Harvard University. She is author of the award-winning Museum Movies: The Museum of Modern Art and the Birth of Art Cinema. She is also co-editor of several volumes, including: Inventing Film Studies (with Lee Grieveson), Useful Cinema (with Charles Acland), and most recently a book on the American military and its use of film and film technologies, with University of California Press. She also co-edits the Cultural Histories of Cinema book series for the BFI, a series dedicated to analyzing cinema’s expansive role in the complex social, economic, and political dynamics of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Her current project maps the importance of portable projectors for the rise and spread of film as a dispersed technological platform, and as institutional and everyday media.

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Monika Kin Gagnon

Professor
Concordia University
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Monika Kin Gagnon is Professor of Communication Studies at Concordia University. She is author of Other Conundrums: Race, Culture, and Canadian Art (2000), 13 Conversations about Art and Cultural Race Politics (2002) with Richard Fung, and co-edited Reimagining Cinema: Film at Expo 67 (2014) with Janine Marchessault. She produced the DVD-catalogue restoration, Charles Gagnon: 4 Films (2009), on her late artist-father’s experimental 1960’s films, and related interactive Korsakow film, Archiving R69 (2011). She was co-curator of In Search of Expo 67 at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal for the 50th anniversary of Expo 67, including an expanded cinema program of digitally restored multi-screen films from Expo 67. She curated La Vie polaire/Polar Life, a digital simulation of the 11-screen Expo 67 film for Cinémathèque Québécoise (2014), and Theresa Hak Kyung Cha | Immatérial for DHC Art/Centre Phi (2015). She is working on Posthumous Cinema: Unfinished Films in the Archives.

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May Chew

Assistant Professor
Concordia University
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May Chew is an Assistant Professor at the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema and Department of Art History at Concordia University. Chew collaborates on Houses on Pengarth, a research and curation project centred on developing a socially-engaged, experimental art lab in Toronto’s Lawrence Heights community. Her recent work includes a chapter in the anthology Material Cultures in Canada (WLU Press, 2015); articles in Imaginations, the International Journal of Heritage Studies, the Journal of Canadian Art History; and Public 57: Archives/Counter-Archives, which she co-edited with Susan Lord and Janine Marchessault.

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