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Arnait Video Productions: Living Archives and Survivance

Arnait Video Productions
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Arnait Video Productions, Production shots from Before Tomorrow, 2008, © Arnait Video Productions. Courtesy of Arnait Video Productions.

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Arnait Video Productions

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Arnait Video Productions

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Arnait Video Productions

This Case Study is creating a bridge between the South and the North by creating site-specific installations around Ottawa.

Drawing from its own archival materials and material from Library and Archives Canada (LAC), Arnait is creating presentations of living archives (archives that are activated through human presence) that embed historical images and video interviews with Inuit women recounting their experiences of urban life.

The Case Study is also developing cultural policy principles and best practices for archiving congruent with UNESCO principles for the management of intangible cultural heritage and Indigenous heritage rights.

About Arnait Video Productions

The goal of Arnait Video Productions (originally the Women’s Video Workshop of Igloolik) is to value the unique culture and voices of Inuit women and to open discussions with Canadians of all origins. Since its beginnings in 1991, Arnait Video Productions has traced a trajectory revealing the originality of its producers, the context of their work and lives, as well as their strong desire to express cultural values unique in Canada.

Land Acknowledgement

Queen’s University is situated on traditional Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee territory. We are grateful to be able to be live, learn and play on these lands.

To acknowledge this traditional territory is to recognize its longer history, one predating the establishment of the earliest European colonies. It is also to acknowledge this territory’s significance for the Indigenous peoples who lived, and continue to live, upon it and whose practices and spiritualties were tied to the land and continue to develop in relationship to the territory and its other inhabitants today. The Kingston Indigenous community continues to reflect the area’s Anishinaabek and Haudenosaunee roots. There is also a significant Métis community and there are First people from other Nations across Turtle Island present here today.

Team Members
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Headshot of Karine Bertrand
Co-applicant

Karine Bertrand

Arnait Case Study Lead
Assistant Professor, Queen's University

Karine Bertrand is a Métis scholar and an assistant professor in the Film and Media department of Queen’s University. Her research interests are centered around Indigenous film and media, Québec cinema, road movies, and oral practices of cinema. Her latest publications include a book chapter on film reception in Inuit communities (Dialogues avec le cinéma, Nota bene, 2016), an article on African and Indigenous cultural memory (Ciném’Action, June 2017), and an article on Arnait Video Productions (Canadian Review of Comparative Literature, March 2017). She is presently working on a project involving the creation of an international network for Indigenous women filmmakers.

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Headshot of Heather Igloliorte
Co-applicant

Heather Igloliorte

Concordia University Research Chair
Concordia University

Heather Igloliorte is an Inuk Assistant Professor and University Research Chair in Indigenous Art History and Community Engagement at Concordia University, where she serves special advisor to the Provost on Advancing Indigenous Knowledges, and co-directs the Indigenous Futures Cluster of the Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture and Technology with Professor Jason Lewis. Her recent curatorial projects include SakKijâjuk: Art and Craft from Nunatsiavut (The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery, touring 2016-2020); Ilippunga: The Brousseau Inuit Art Collection at the Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec (permanent exhibition, opened 2016); and Decolonize Me (Ottawa Art Gallery, touring 2011 - 2015), and the forthcoming inaugural exhibition of the Inuit Art Centre at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. Igloliorte currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Inuit Art Foundation, Nunavut Film Board, Native North American Art Studies Association, and Faculty Council of the Otsego Institute for Native American Art History.
 

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Headshot of Julie Nagam
Co-applicant

Julie Nagam

Chair in the History of Indigenous Art in North America
University of Winnipeg

Dr. Julie Nagam (Meětis-German/Syrian) is the Chair of the History of Indigenous Art in North America, a joint appointment between the University of Winnipeg and the Winnipeg Art Gallery. She is an Associate Professor in the department of Art History. Her current SSHRC funded projects include The Transactive Memory Keepers: Indigenous Public Engagement in Digital and New Media Labs and Exhibitions (www.glamcollective.ca), Inuit Futures in Arts Leadership: The Pilimmaksarniq Project; The Initiative for Indigenous Futures. Dr. Nagam hosted and organized, The Future is Indigenous (http://abtec.org/iif/symposia/3rd-annual-symposium/) and the International Indigenous curators exchange with Australia, Canada, Aotearoa (New Zealand), and Finland. She has published extensively in the area of Indigenous visual culture, methodologies, performance, digital and new media. Her artwork and scholarship has been shown nationally and internationally. Nagam is the Concordia University and Massey University Scholar in Residence for 2018/19, and is building an Indigenous Research Centre of Excellence and a Digital Media Lab in Winnipeg. 

Photo Credit: Kali Spitzer

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Headshot of Carla Taunton
Co-applicant

Carla Taunton

Associate Professor
NSCAD University

Dr. Carla Taunton is an Associate Professor in the Division of Art History and Contemporary Culture at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University (NSCAD) and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the department of Cultural Studies at Queen’s University. Taunton is a white-settler scholar whose areas of expertise include arts-based critique of settler colonialism, Indigenous arts and methodologies, contemporary Canadian art, museum and curatorial studies, as well as theories of decolonization, anti-colonialism, and settler responsibility. Her recent collaborative research projects include: The GLAM Collective, The Pilimmaksarniq/Pijariuqsarniq Project: Inuit Futures in Arts Leadership (2017), Archive/Counter-Archive: Activating Canada’s Moving Image Heritage (2018 - 2024), Transactive Memory Keepers (2016-ongoing); This is What I Wish You Knew: Urban Aboriginal Artists (2015-ongoing), and Theories and Methodologies for Indigenous Arts in North America (2014-ongoing). Her recent publications include “Performing Sovereignty: Forces to be Reckoned With” in More Caught in the Act (2016), and “Embodying Sovereignty: Indigenous Women’s Performance Art in Canada,” in Narratives Unfolding (2017). With Dr. Julie Nagam and Dr. Heather Igloliorte, she co-edited PUBLIC 54: Indigenous Art, and in 2017 with Igloliorte she co-edited a special issue of RACAR on Indigenous art histories.

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Artist Talk: Arnait Video Productions

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The Commons - 401 Richmond Street West, Suite 440
Toronto ON M5V 3A8
Canada

Event Description
Inuit and non-Inuit members of Arnait Video Productions from three generations dialogue about their collective filmmaking practice with writer and curator Candice Hopkins (Carcross/Tagish First Nation).
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Arnait Ikajurtigiit: Women helping each other

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Art Gallery of York University - Accolade East Building - 4700 Keele Street
Toronto ON M3J 1P3
Canada

Event Description
Arnait Ikajurtigiit: Women helping each other is a Primary Exhibition of 2019 Scotiabank CONTACT Festival and presented in partnership with the 2019 Images Festival. It is curated by Interim Assistant Director/Curator Alissa Firth-Eagland. Arnait is a dynamic collective of women filmmakers from the Arctic whose films speak directly to the lives of its Inuit and non-Inuit members. The sheer endurance required to realize these video documents testifies to the importance of Arnait’s collaboration and the value of their work.
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