Welcome to Archive/Counterarchive

Indigenous Methodologies

This Working Group will be focus primarily on research-creation projects driven by Indigenous methodologies, along with key ethical and historical considerations. They will be working in a consulting capacity to the Case Studies and other areas of the A/CA network.

Team Members
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Headshot of Karine Bertrand
Co-applicant

Karine Bertrand

Arnait Case Study Lead
Assistant Professor, Queen's University

Karine Bertrand is a Métis scholar and an assistant professor in the Film and Media department of Queen’s University. Her research interests are centered around Indigenous film and media, Québec cinema, road movies, and oral practices of cinema. Her latest publications include a book chapter on film reception in Inuit communities (Dialogues avec le cinéma, Nota bene, 2016), an article on African and Indigenous cultural memory (Ciném’Action, June 2017), and an article on Arnait Video Productions (Canadian Review of Comparative Literature, March 2017). She is presently working on a project involving the creation of an international network for Indigenous women filmmakers.

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Headshot of Camille Callison
Co-applicant

Camille Callison

Learning and Organizational Development Librarian
University of Manitoba

Camille Callison, Tsesk iye (Crow) Clan of the Tahltan Nation, was the first Indigenous Services Librarian/Liaison Librarian now the Learning & Organizational Development Librarian and a PhD student (Anthropology) at the University of Manitoba. Camille is Vice-Chair, Indigenous Representative, Canadian Federation of Library Associations (CFLA-FCAB) & Chair, Indigenous Matters Committee, Copyright Committee member, chaired the Truth and Reconciliation Committee, an Indigenous Partner on The Response to the Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Taskforce, and is on the Advisory Committee for the First Nations Concentration at UBC iSchool. She is a member of IFLA Indigenous Matters Section Standing Committee and the Canadian Commission for UNESCO Memory of the World Committee and Sector Commission on Culture, Communications & Information. Camille has presented extensively on the importance of respectful curation, preservation, access, and protection of Indigenous knowledge and cultural memory in libraries, museums, and archives and developing meaningful relationship with Indigenous communities.

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Headshot of Heather Igloliorte
Co-applicant

Heather Igloliorte

Concordia University Research Chair
Concordia University

Heather Igloliorte is an Inuk Assistant Professor and University Research Chair in Indigenous Art History and Community Engagement at Concordia University, where she serves special advisor to the Provost on Advancing Indigenous Knowledges, and co-directs the Indigenous Futures Cluster of the Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture and Technology with Professor Jason Lewis. Her recent curatorial projects include SakKijâjuk: Art and Craft from Nunatsiavut (The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery, touring 2016-2020); Ilippunga: The Brousseau Inuit Art Collection at the Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec (permanent exhibition, opened 2016); and Decolonize Me (Ottawa Art Gallery, touring 2011 - 2015), and the forthcoming inaugural exhibition of the Inuit Art Centre at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. Igloliorte currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Inuit Art Foundation, Nunavut Film Board, Native North American Art Studies Association, and Faculty Council of the Otsego Institute for Native American Art History.
 

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Headshot of Dolleen Manning
Co-applicant

Dolleen Tisawii'ashii Manning

Artist in Residence
Michigan State University

Manning is a member of Kettle and Stoney Point First Nation, an interdisciplinary artist, scholar, educator and youngest of twelve. Currently, she resides in Toronto and is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at Michigan State University (Philosophy, 2018-2020). She received a PhD from the Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism at the University of Western Ontario (2018), and holds graduate degrees in critical theory (MA, UWO, 2005), and in contemporary art (MFA, Simon Fraser, 1997), and a BFA in Fine Arts (Windsor, 1994). Manning's interests in archives stems from her family's land claim activism and the function of the archive in the colonial state. She is also interested in the counter archive from the perspective of Anishinaabe epistemology and imaging practices.

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Headshot of Suzanne Morrissette
Collaborator

Suzanne Morrissette

Assistant Professor
OCAD University

Suzanne Morrissette is a Métis artist, curator, and scholar from Winnipeg. Her research draws upon histories of place to examine, on the one hand, western society’s ongoing investments in capitalist and colonial narratives, as well as personal knowledge and lived experience. Morrissette holds a PhD in Social and Political Thought at York University. Her visual art research has been included in such recent exhibitions as wnoondwaamin (we hear them) (2016-18). Her most recent curatorial project, On Being Illiberal looks to the work of three artists – Carl Beam, Merritt Johnson, and Fallon Simard – who each provide vantage points from which problematize public perception of Indigenous political thought. Morrissette has received numerous grants from provincial and national arts councils to support her artistic and curatorial practices. She has taught liberal arts and studio courses at various universities since 2011, and currently works as Assistant Professor at OCAD University.

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Headshot of Julie Nagam
Co-applicant

Julie Nagam

Chair in the History of Indigenous Art in North America
University of Winnipeg

Dr. Julie Nagam (Meětis-German/Syrian) is the Chair of the History of Indigenous Art in North America, a joint appointment between the University of Winnipeg and the Winnipeg Art Gallery. She is an Associate Professor in the department of Art History. Her current SSHRC funded projects include The Transactive Memory Keepers: Indigenous Public Engagement in Digital and New Media Labs and Exhibitions (www.glamcollective.ca), Inuit Futures in Arts Leadership: The Pilimmaksarniq Project; The Initiative for Indigenous Futures. Dr. Nagam hosted and organized, The Future is Indigenous (http://abtec.org/iif/symposia/3rd-annual-symposium/) and the International Indigenous curators exchange with Australia, Canada, Aotearoa (New Zealand), and Finland. She has published extensively in the area of Indigenous visual culture, methodologies, performance, digital and new media. Her artwork and scholarship has been shown nationally and internationally. Nagam is the Concordia University and Massey University Scholar in Residence for 2018/19, and is building an Indigenous Research Centre of Excellence and a Digital Media Lab in Winnipeg. 

Photo Credit: Kali Spitzer

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Headshot of Dylan Robinson
Co-applicant

Dylan Robinson

Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Arts
Queen's University

Dylan Robinson is a xwélméxw artist and writer of Stó:lō descent, and the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Arts at Queen’s University. His current research focuses on Indigenous public art, and the incarceration of Indigenous songs in museums. Robinson’s publications include the edited volumes Music and Modernity Among Indigenous Peoples of North America (2018), Arts of Engagement: Taking Aesthetic Action in and Beyond the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (2016), and Opera Indigene (2011). His monograph, Hungry Listening, is forthcoming in 2019 with Minnesota University Press.

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Headshot of Carla Taunton
Co-applicant

Carla Taunton

Associate Professor
NSCAD University

Dr. Carla Taunton is an Associate Professor in the Division of Art History and Contemporary Culture at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University (NSCAD) and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the department of Cultural Studies at Queen’s University. Taunton is a white-settler scholar whose areas of expertise include arts-based critique of settler colonialism, Indigenous arts and methodologies, contemporary Canadian art, museum and curatorial studies, as well as theories of decolonization, anti-colonialism, and settler responsibility. Her recent collaborative research projects include: The GLAM Collective, The Pilimmaksarniq/Pijariuqsarniq Project: Inuit Futures in Arts Leadership (2017), Archive/Counter-Archive: Activating Canada’s Moving Image Heritage (2018 - 2024), Transactive Memory Keepers (2016-ongoing); This is What I Wish You Knew: Urban Aboriginal Artists (2015-ongoing), and Theories and Methodologies for Indigenous Arts in North America (2014-ongoing). Her recent publications include “Performing Sovereignty: Forces to be Reckoned With” in More Caught in the Act (2016), and “Embodying Sovereignty: Indigenous Women’s Performance Art in Canada,” in Narratives Unfolding (2017). With Dr. Julie Nagam and Dr. Heather Igloliorte, she co-edited PUBLIC 54: Indigenous Art, and in 2017 with Igloliorte she co-edited a special issue of RACAR on Indigenous art histories.

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Indigineity and Archives

Date
Location

Loyalist College - 376 Wallbridge-Loyalist
Belleville ON K8N 5B9
Canada

Event Description
Featuring A/CA Co-Applicant Camille Callison - participants will look at how to ensure policies and best practices comply with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Issues related to informed consent, cultural protection, copyright and subject headings will be surveyed.
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